Skip to main content Libguides

Library Home Ask a Librarian Calendar

Microsoft Word 2010 and 2013: Page Numbers

This guide is based on a similar guide from the University of Michigan Libraries. See attribution box at the bottom of the page for more information.

Quick Links

Editing Header and Footer

In Word 2010, you can edit the headers and footers by double clicking in the space in which they appear on the document.

Note: In Word 2013, you can no longer double click on the header or footer to edit them. Instead, right click on the header or footer and choose Edit Footer (or header) to get into editing mode.

When you are finished editing, you can get back to the normal document by hitting the Close Header and Footer button in the Header Design Ribbon.

Adding Page Numbers

Microsoft Word provides you with the option of selecting a numbering style (e.g. “Roman Numeral”, “Arabic”) and gives you the option of selecting the “starting at” number.  You can set the page numbers for your entire document, or if you need more control, you can do it section-by-section as well.

If you want continuous pagination that is all in the same format, go to the Insert Ribbon, and in the Header & Footer Group, click on the Page Number icon. Choose the appropriate placement of the number and a style.

If you have a more complicated pagination. For example, Rackham’s guidelines require that the page numbers begin on the third or fourth page of your document (depending on if you include a graphical frontispiece) and the page number on that page should be Roman numeral “ii”. Page numbering should continue on in roman numerals until the first page of Chapter 1 is reached.  At that point, the numbering should restart in Arabic (“1, 2, 3…”).

To accomplish this, we are going to divide the document into different “sections”, break them apart (so they can have different page number formatting), and then add the page numbers.

View this video and or see the written sections below on how to achieve this.

Attribution and Thanks

The information provided in this guide is based upon a guide created by the University of Michigan Libraries.  They have graciously made their guide available under a Creative Commons License 4.0.  Please click the link to visit the UofM original.